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Showing posts from September, 2012

Sewing McCall's Pattern 9682: Misses' Three-Section Skirt

Following a disappointing breakdown in the vintage blouse sewing, I needed an easy-breezy and fun project to get my sewing mojo back. The requisites? Fabric must not be silky/slick (twill is totally opposite the flowing blouse fabric), pattern must not require much altering, and I want to be able to wear it same-day. Here we are!

Contents: 2 yards of herringbone twill for $2.99, smelling like it came from some grandmother's musty basement. Zipper was part of giant bundle (30+) of vintage new & recycled zips that one woman had donated and I bought for just a few dollars, so we'll call it $.10. The piping and seam binding were also from vintage bundles for just a couple dollars, so we'll call them $.50 for the three. The pattern for $.99. The only non-thrifted parts of this garment are the woven interfacing that I had laying around and thread-- it was a partial spool from my stash probably ripped from mom's store, a sewing business, many years ago. . Total cost: $4.5…

Altering patterns to fit my body. Figuring out vintage patterns. Getting overwhelmed.

Oh the hours I've spent sleuthing the internet for an easy answer to my fitting problems. I've been posting my sewing projects over at Patternreview.com and recently a couple of other users gave me useful feedback on potential fitting/alteration needs for my body, including narrow shoulders and/or back, possible swayback (more inward curvature at my lower back than is standard), and a good reminder of my pear shape that could warrant a bit of extra room at the hip in blouse patterns.

You see, I'm just wrapping my head around pattern fitting and alteration. Using the book Fitting & Pattern Alteration: A Multi-Method Approach to guide me through basic understanding, I've been reading about body measurements, different methods of alteration, and fit analysis that gives recommandation for alterations specific to body differences and resulting fabric/clothing distortion. It's a lot to absorb and especially hard to try fitting myself properly without assistance fro…

Sewing Vogue Pattern 8323, Misses' Top with Princess Seams

Copying and pasting the format from patternreview.com. Love that site! Here's my version of V8323, a test run of my sewing skills, the pattern itself, and mostly because I wanted to use my new serger and had the needed supplies on hand. I sewed this project back at the end of July but haven't gotten around to posting until now.

Pattern Description:

MISSES’/MISSES’ PETITE TOPS: Knit tops with princess seams and stitched hems. A: sleeveless armholes with bias tape finish. B: cowl collar neckline with below elbow length sleeves. C: scoop neckline with bias tape finish.
NOTIONS: Top A, C: 1/2" Single Fold Bias Tape: 13/8 yds. for A and 1 yd. for C.
FABRICS: † Moderate Stretch Knits Only: Wool Jersey, Cotton Knits and Matte Jersey. Unsuitable for obvious diagonals. Allow extra fabric to match plaids or stripes. Use nap yardages/layouts for pile, shaded or one-way design fabrics. *with nap. **without nap.


Pattern Sizing:

Here is Vogue's measurement and size chart.

I made a si…

Sewing Simplicity Pattern 4437: Misses' Sleeveless Top (1960's)

Seeing that autumn has arrived with a chill in the morning and shorter days, I've sewn a summer shirt just in time to wear it before the last warmth fades away. Ideally this project would have been completed a couple months ago when I bought the fabric (just a few dollars at Goodwill, only used 1/2 of the yardage) and thought immediately of this pattern (another 99 cent steal at Goodwill) but my creativity was on hold and my weekdays overfilled with farming, the weekends filled with plans away from my sewing machine.

So here we are: a blouse!
For a minute I imagined myself getting into the photo shoot with a great bouffant or beehive hairstyle and dramatic eyeliner but when I actually approached the up-do I knew I'd fail miserably. This woman owns no hairpins (bobby pins), holding gel, or hairspray. I happen to own one round bristle brush that carried over from days of yore when I'd blow out my locks and heat-iron them straight, and one not-so-useful wide-tooth comb that …